Program Schedule

Presenters and time slots are subject to change

  • THURSDAY APRIL 7, 2016

    Pre-Conference

    Goals and Objectives
    Multiple presenters from Henry Ford Health System focus on the Zero Suicide Initiative and its application in hospital and primary care environments. Sessions are aimed at Medical ED personnel (intake, triage, nurses); ED and Psych residents and Medical students; ED physicians, Primary Care Physicians, Mental Health Professionals (social workers, psychologists) and First Responders.

    • The suicide epidemic – facts and information
    • The HFHS Zero Suicide Initiative – Intervention methods
    • How to collaborate on identifying individuals at risk
    • Dealing with grief of loss

    7:30 am – 1:00 pm

    Pre-Conference

    Zero Suicide Pre-Conference

    7:30 – 8:00 am

    Registration

    8:00 – 8:15 am

    John Urso

    Introductions

    8:15 – 9:15 am

    Doree Ann V. Espiritu, M.D

    Henry Ford Behavioral Health Services’ Perfect Depression Care: A Model for Eliminating Suicides & Mental Healthcare Transformation - In this presentation, Dr. Doree Ann Espiritu will describe the journey that led to the development of a model that led to the Zero Suicide Initiative and the spread of perfect depression care in Henry Ford Primary Care Clinics.

    9:15 – 10:00 am

    Dr. Brian Ahmedani, LMSW

    Testing and skill based training to assess and respond to suicide risk. Statistical research on Zero Suicide Initiative - Testing and skill based training to assess and respond to suicide risk. Statistical research on Zero Suicide Initiative.

    10:15 – 11:00 am

    Jennifer M. Peltzer-Jones PsyD, RN

    “In case of an Emergency, go to the nearest ED” Emergency Department identification of suicide risk and management.

    11:00 – 11:45 am

    Kelly Rogalski, M.D.

    The epidemic of teen suicide – "Teen Suicide: identifying risk and responding" this talk will include risk identification as it applies to teens and how we designed and implemented a systematic process for both risk stratification and safety planning at Henry Ford.

    Noon – 1:00 pm

    Lunch - Depak Prabhakar, M.D., HFHS

    The Silent Victim – Impact of Patient Suicide on Providers

    11:00 am – 3:30 pm

    First Responder's Workshop

    11:00 am – Noon

    Registration for Training Workshop

    Noon – 1:00 pm

    Lunch - Depak Prabhakar, M.D., HFHS

    The Silent Victim – Impact of Patient Suicide on Providers

    1:30 – 3:30 pm

    Barb Smith

    Training workshop – Barb will discuss the warning signs and risk factors of suicide to help when investigating and working with families at a scene, recommendation on delivering a death notification, and discussion of what puts law enforcement at risk for suicide. This presentation will leave you with tools to work that "unthinkable" uncomfortable scene of a suicide.

    6:00 – 9:00 pm

    Documentary Film Premiere

    6:00 – 7:30 pm

    Premiere Reception (Garden Gallery)

    $125 ticket – Includes cocktails and hors-d'oeuvres followed by the film presentation and dessert in Master Ballroom. This is an opportunity to meet and network with the conference speakers, presenters and sponsors.

    7:00 – 7:30 pm

    Film Premiere Only (Grand Ballroom)

    $35 ticket – Includes 1 drink ticket, cash bar, film presentation and dessert.

    7:30 pm

    Dr. Frank McGeorge

    John Urso

    Welcome and Introductions

    8:00 – 9:00 pm

    Presentation of documentary film

    Death is NOT the Answer” – Director and Executive Producer, Keith Famie – Working closely with Rabbi Daniel Syme of Temple Beth El, Dennis Liegghio, Founder/President of Know Resolve, and "Kevin's Song," a Metropolitan Detroit-based nonprofit organization, Death is not the Answer will tackle tough issues through real-life stories that will allow the audience to gain a better understanding of depression as well as the tragic outcome of suicide.

    9:00 pm

    Coffee and dessert

  • FRIDAY APRIL 8, 2016

    Conference Day 1

    Goals and Objectives
    The goal of the Kevin’s Song Conference on Suicide is to provide a local forum for those who share an interest in the causes and means of prevention of suicide, including physicians, psychologists, nurses, social workers, clinicians, educators, public policy makers, clergy, crisis center workers, students and veterans, as well as those who have lost a loved one to suicide or had their own suicidal experience to meet. It will be an opportunity to share information about suicide and the repercussions of suicide as well as how to identify and assess those at risk and learn about the means of prevention.

    7:00 – 8:00 am

    Registration/Breakfast

    8:00 – 11:00 am

    Plenary Session

    8:00 – 8:30 am

    John Urso, , Co-Founder, Kevin’s Song

    Opening Remarks – Tom Watkins, CEO and Executive Director, Detroit Wayne Mental Health Authority - Tom will share his personal story of being touched by suicide and will report on the status of mental health services in the greater Detroit area and around the State of Michigan

    8:30 – 9:30 am

    Thomas Joiner, Ph.D.

    Keynote Session, Why People Die by Suicide – In his new theory of suicidal behavior, Thomas Joiner proposes three factors that mark those most at risk of death: the feeling of being a burden on loved ones; the sense of isolation; and, perhaps chillingly, the learned ability to hurt oneself. He tests the theory against diverse facts taken from clinical anecdotes, history, literature, popular culture, anthropology, epidemiology, genetics, and neurobiology--facts about suicide rates among men and women; white and African-American men; anorexics, athletes, prostitutes, and physicians; members of cults, sports fans, and citizens of nations in crisis.

    9:30 – 10:00 am

    Doree Ann V. Espiritu, M.D

    Integration of suicide risk assessment into hospital-based systems.

    10:00 – 10:45 am

    Michelle Cornette, Ph.D.

    “The Pursuit for Perfect Care & the Zero Suicide Initiative: Audacious Goals?” – In this presentation, Dr. Doree Ann Espiritu will describe how Henry Ford Behavioral Health Services transformed mental health care by pursuing perfect depression care and eliminating suicide in their target population. Our patient: Lynn Gaunt will share her story.

    10:45 – 11:00 am

    BREAK

    11:00 am – 12:00 pm

    Breakout Session

    #1

    Polly Gipson, Ph.D.

    Youth Suicide Risk and Bullying: What Youth Aren’t Telling You that You Need to Know – Youth suicide is the second leading cause of death, a national public health concern (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2013). Bullying, also a national public health issue, is associated with elevated youth suicide risk. This workshop will provide information to learners about what constitutes youth bullying and the myriad ways youth psychologically manifest the impact of bullying on victims and/or perpetrators that elevates suicide risk. Prevention and intervention strategies will be shared.

    Gigi Colombini, LMSW

    How a mental health professional can support someone through a suicide crisis – In this session, participants will learn some a language they can use to make understanding a client’s level of suicidality easier and have the discussion be more comfortable for both the client and the practitioner. Much like learning any foreign language, the more we use it, the better we are able to speak and understand it if someone begins to talk about it.

    Lawrence Wentworth, Ph.D.

    EMDR as a suicide prevention psychotherapy and EMDR as a treatment modality for those who have lost a loved one – This breakout session will present a brief overview of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) an evidence-based form of psychotherapy. EMDR is now one of THE treatments of choice for trauma according to the World Health Organization and the Department of Defense. Often, unresolved trauma can lead to self-loathing and, ultimately, suicide. EMDR can help to prevent this. EMDR can also be an effective form of psychotherapy for survivors who are suffering from the traumatic images and thoughts that haunt those that have lost a loved one to suicide.

    Amelia Lehto

    Social Media Skills: New Media for Messaging – Thought leader with experience at the intersection of social media and suicide prevention will provide training in best practice social media skills and strategies for personal and professional venues. Presenter will provide overview and introduction into social media best practices, and then will provide coaching for a cross-section of peers and professionals, addressing social media skills specific to their discipline's needs. Group members will develop a responsible social media policy, will receive assistance setting social media accounts as needed, and will receive assistance in developing, tagging, and curating content. Participants will leave the workshop with conference-specific social media skills they can immediately apply to their lives.

    Tish Vincent

    Ken Meisel, LSMW

    Yvette Hourigan

    Carolyn Batchelor, LMSW

    Dr. Edward Jouney, D.O.

    Panel discussion on the impact of suicide on professionals – This panel will focus on the emotional stressors that professionals face in their respective careers and how left untreated, these individuals are at risk of becoming depressed and, at times, suicidal, evidenced by the high rate of suicide among lawyers, doctors, dentists, pharmacists, etc. This is a problem with no discreet answers. The panel has the goal of reducing the stigma of secondary trauma while educating about best practices in responding to professionals who face emotional trauma in their respective careers. The panel will draw on the work presented throughout the conference as a starting point for exploration of the unique stressors these professionals face. Best practices for addressing these challenges will be shared.

    Judith Burdick, M.A., L.L.P.

    Suicide: From Stigma to Transformation – Stigmatized death, as it relates to suicide, evokes tremendous fear and anxiety in both the greater culture and survivors alike. Survivors are often conflicted about disclosing the true nature and cause of death; and consequently, this holding back limits opportunities to receive much needed social support for proper healing to take place. This, in turn, leads to complex emotions often contributing to high levels of guilt and shame, resulting in depression. In her presentation, Judith Burdick will address the stigma of suicide, its complexities and practical methods to move toward transformation.

    12:15 – 1:30 pm

    Plenary Session

    Lunch/Speaker (Judea Room)

    12:30 – 1:30 pm

    Cheryl King, Ph.D.

    Recognizing and Responding to Youth Suicide Risk: Here’s Where We – This session will provide an up-to-date overview of school and emergency department based youth suicide risk screening strategies, including the evidence base, strengths and weaknesses of these strategies. Several possible initial interventions in response to positive screens will also be described. The presentation will close with a summary of where we stand and next steps.

    1:45 – 2:45 pm

    Breakout Session

    #2

    Rev. Marianne Grano

    Rabbi Daniel B. Syme

    Dr. Imam Achmat Salie

    Brother Ray Stadmeyer

    Lynn Maitland, Moderator

    Clergy Panel, Acceptance and Hope: Perspectives on Suicide from Faith Traditions – How can faith help us through times of loss and pain when someone dies of suicide? Is suicide a sin? How can people of faith help those affected by suicide, and reach out to people who may be at risk? Clergy from three great monotheistic traditions—Jewish, Christian, and Islamic—address the theme "Acceptance and Hope: Perspectives on Suicide from the Faith Traditions," with time for questions and interfaith discussion.

    Nicole Law, Psy.D.

    The Hidden Risks of LGBT Youth – LGBT youth are at an increased risk for suicide and self-harm. This presentation will discuss the impact of factors such as heteronormativity, culture and language have on identity, self-worth and suicide risk. The session will also explore methods of reducing the impact these factors have on suicide risk in school, community and healthcare settings.

    Michelle Cornette, Ph.D.

    Military and Veteran suicide risk – Military/veteran suicide has garnered much media attention in recent years. Epidemiological research suggests that suicide rates among veterans has more than double that of age, gender-matched peers with no military service history. The volume of resources expended by VA and DoD in recent years has led to an explosion of research findings on the epidemiology and etiology of military and veteran suicide. The epidemiology of military/ veteran suicide, as well as common and specific risk factors for suicide, will be reviewed in this presentation.

    Karen M. Marshall

    Pat Smith, MS, RD

    Matthew Owens, CNO, Oakland County Community Mental Health Authority (OCCMHA)

    State of Michigan update – DHS initiatives, Medicaid – This session will focus on local and state resources for mental health professionals and educators to address suicidal risks and intervention. Learn the opportunities for advances in suicide prevention over the next 4 years with federally-funded investment in Michigan’s Youth Suicide Prevention programming.

    Gloria Harrington, LMSW, CCRP

    Recent developments in the diagnosis and treatment of this complex disease – Demonstrate the need for longitudinal studies. Identify methods to foster participatory collaborations between healthcare researchers and patient. Discuss current areas of research in bipolar disorder and strategies for enhancing multi-disciplinary collaborations. Illustrate best practices for motivating community interest in participatory research to test new ideas, treatments or management strategies, as well as managing recruitment for competing studies.

    Polly Gipson, Ph.D.

    Youth Suicide Risk and Bullying: What Youth Aren’t Telling You that You Need to Know – Youth suicide is the second leading cause of death, a national public health concern (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2013). Bullying, also a national public health issue, is associated with elevated youth suicide risk. This workshop will provide information to learners about what constitutes youth bullying and the myriad ways youth psychologically manifest the impact of bullying as victims and/or perpetrators that elevates suicide risk. Prevention and intervention strategies will be shared.

    3:00 – 4:00 pm

    Breakout Session

    #3

    Jim Hassett, MA, LLPC, CT/RTC

    Peter Driscoll

    Presentation on Choice Theory and Reality Therapy – This presentation will focus on the relationship between mental health and suicide prevention. Through the teachings of Dr. William Glasser and Choice Theory, James and Peter will present an essential outline of the things we know about unhappy people and how knowing and practicing Choice Theory and Reality Therapy can empower someone who is willing to make the effort to “Take Charge of Their Life” and begin to move toward stronger, supportive relationships starting today!

    Gloria Harrington, LMSW, CCRP

    Recent developments in the diagnosis and treatment of this complex disease (repeat) – Demonstrate the need for longitudinal studies. Identify methods to foster participatory collaborations between healthcare researchers and patient. Discuss current areas of research in bipolar disorder and strategies for enhancing multi-disciplinary collaborations. Illustrate best practices for motivating community interest in participatory research to test new ideas, treatments or management strategies, as well as managing recruitment for competing studies.

    Jean Nemenzik, LMSW

    Understanding Common Mental Health Crisis and Practical Ways to Respond: A preview of Mental Health First Aid – One in every 5 adults in America live and work with a diagnosed mental illness or disability. Understanding what that means and how to assist others in getting needed help can be a valuable resource in increasing health, productivity and managing risk in our community. Mental Health First Aid is an evidenced based best practice for helping non-mental health professionals recognize the most common mental health crisis’s we encounter on a daily basis; and how to help until professional assistance can be obtained. Jean Nemenzik, LMSW will provide an overview of Mental Health First Aid and present more information about how Mental Health First Aid can benefit your organization and community.

    Karen M. Marshall

    Pat Smith, MS, RD

    State of Michigan update – DHS initiatives, Medicaid (repeat) – This session will focus on local and state resources for mental health professionals and educators to address suicidal risks and intervention. Learn the opportunities for advances in suicide prevention over the next 4 years with federally-funded investment in Michigan’s Youth Suicide Prevention programming.

    Carri Griffin, LMSW

    Angela D'Agostini-Miller, LMSW

    Suicide Prevention in Schools Safe Talk Training Part 1 – Session will present information and training on Implementation of Suicide Prevention Programs in schools. SafeTALK is a training program that teaches participants to recognize and engage persons who might be having thoughts of suicide and to connect them with community resources trained in suicide intervention. SafeTALK stresses safety while challenging taboos that inhibit open talk about suicide. The ‘safe’ of safeTALK stands for ‘suicide alertness for everyone’. The ‘TALK’ letters stand for the practice actions that one does to help those with thoughts of suicide: Tell, Ask, Listen, and KeepSafe.

    Barb Smith

    First Responders Training Workshop Part 1 – Barb will discuss the warning signs and risk factors of suicide to help when investigating and working with families at a scene, recommendation on delivering a death notification, and discussion of what puts law enforcement at risk for suicide. This presentation will leave you with tools to work that "unthinkable" uncomfortable scene of a suicide. Basics of prevention, intervention and investigation of suicide to assist first responders who work with those at risk and to prepare then to work with families in the aftermath of a completed or attempted suicide.

    Joe Kort, Ph.D.

    Understanding Males Who’ve Been Sexually Abused and Why They Attempt Suicide – Current statistics, based on those that are reported, say one in three women and one in six men will be sexually abused in their lifetime. This workshop will help you understand the traits that are characteristic of people who have suffered the trauma of sexual abuse, specifically traits that are unique to male survivors. This seminar will explore why it is especially difficult for men to talk about their sexual abuse and attempt suicide and how powerful their struggles and recovery are. This workshop could be the missing link to help you help these males find their voice, find their peace, and reclaim themselves and their lives.

    4:15 – 5:15 pm

    Breakout Session

    #4

    Gigi Colombini, LMSW

    How to engage the family’s help during a suicidal crisis – In this session, participants will learn how to talk with the families of their clients in the event of a suicidal crisis. They will be able to teach the family how to ask “how suicidal are you feeling” and discuss ways to get an honest answer from their loved ones, and then what to do if things have gotten worse. Since a family goes into crisis when their loved one is in crisis, we will discuss ways to get the family through their feelings in order for them to be of help for the suicidal person.

    Amelia Lehto

    Social Media Skills: New Media for Messaging (repeat) – Thought leader with experience at the intersection of social media and suicide prevention will provide training in best practice social media skills and strategies for personal and professional venues. Presenter will provide overview and introduction into social media best practices, and then will provide coaching for a cross-section of peers and professionals, addressing social media skills specific to their discipline's needs. Group members will develop a responsible social media policy, will receive assistance setting social media accounts as needed, and will receive assistance in developing, tagging, and curating content. Participants will leave the workshop with conference-specific social media skills they can immediately apply to their lives.

    Carri Griffin, LMSW

    Angela D'Agostini-Miller, LMSW

    Suicide Prevention in Schools Safe Talk Training Part 2 – Session will present information and training on Implementation of Suicide Prevention Programs in schools. SafeTALK is a training program that teaches participants to recognize and engage persons who might be having thoughts of suicide and to connect them with community resources trained in suicide intervention. SafeTALK stresses safety while challenging taboos that inhibit open talk about suicide. The ‘safe’ of safeTALK stands for ‘suicide alertness for everyone’. The ‘TALK’ letters stand for the practice actions that one does to help those with thoughts of suicide: Tell, Ask, Listen, and KeepSafe.

    Barb Smith

    First Responders Training Workshop Part 2 – Barb will discuss the warning signs and risk factors of suicide to help when investigating and working with families at a scene, recommendation on delivering a death notification, and discussion of what puts law enforcement at risk for suicide. This presentation will leave you with tools to work that "unthinkable" uncomfortable scene of a suicide. Basics of prevention, intervention and investigation of suicide to assist first responders who work with those at risk and to prepare then to work with families in the aftermath of a completed or attempted suicide.

    Andrea L. Smith, MSW

    QPR Training (QPR stands for Question, Persuade, and Refer) — the 3 simple steps anyone can learn to help save a life from suicide. QPR offers extended learning opportunities for professions which are especially likely to come into contact with individuals who are in-crisis or suicidal. Just as people trained in CPR and the Heimlich Maneuver help save thousands of lives each year, people trained in QPR learn how to recognize the warning signs of a suicide crisis and how to question, persuade, and refer someone to help. Key components covered in training: How to Question, Persuade and Refer someone who may be suicidal How to get help for yourself or learn more about preventing suicide The common causes of suicidal behavior The warning signs of suicide How to get help for someone in crisis

    5:30 – 6:15 pm

    Plenary Session

    Speaker

    5:30 – 6:15 pm

    Dennis Liegghio

    Loss survivor and founder of KnowResolve, presenting the profoundly moving and meaningful presentation that he makes to high school students throughout Michigan.

    6:30 – 9:00 pm

    Reception

    Casual Supper, Refreshments and Entertainment (Wisdom)  Open to all attendees at no additional charge

  • SATURDAY APRIL 9, 2016

    Conference Day 2 and Saturday Conference Only

    Goals and Objectives
    The focus of the Saturday program is for survivors of suicide loss, support group facilitators, mental health professionals, and others interested in sharing and understanding the loss and grief following a suicide. The goal is to provide loss survivors with information and resources to help with their individual journeys through loss, grief and healing and to assist mental health professionals and other caregivers in understanding the needs of loss survivors.

    7:30 – 8:00 am

    Registration

    8:00 – 9:00 am

    Plenary Session

    Breakfast/Speaker

    8:00 – 9:00 am

    Deena Baxter

    After losing her adult son to suicide, Deena Baxter launched “The Surviving Suicide and Sudden Loss Project” with the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) of Collier County, FL - a book and website project dedicated to “Giving mental health a life-affirming voice.” Deena shares how embracing humanity and all its imperfections kept her anchored when her personal world spun off its axis. She includes heartache, healing and humor in her presentation as well as helpful tools for those who are searching for “Normal”. Her advocacy platform includes personal wellness responsibility, the impacts of stigma, access to resources, healthy ways to grieve, need for independent mental health research, HIPPA challenges, and reasonable approaches to marijuana legislation and gun legislation.

    9:15 – 10:30 am

    Plenary Session

    Survivor Panel

    9:15 – 10:30am

    Michelle Cornette, Ph.D.

    Dennis Liegghio

    Kevin Fischer

    Jim Adams, Director of Operations, Fox 2 News

    Moderator: Gail Urso, Co-Founder, Kevin’s Song

    This moderated panel discussion will highlight the personal stories of survivors of suicide loss whose experiences with grief and recovery will inspire and provide insight into the process of suicide loss, healing and HOPE.

    10:45 – 11:45 am

    Breakout Session

    #5

    Survivor Small Group Sessions

    Moderated discussions for loss and attempt survivors. Attempt survivors will also have opportunity to meet in private breakout room with a licensed mental health professional

    Lawrence Wentworth, Ph.D.

    EMDR as a suicide prevention psychotherapy and EMDR as a treatment modality for those who have lost a loved one (repeat) – This breakout session will present a brief overview of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) an evidence-based form of psychotherapy. EMDR is now one of THE treatments of choice for trauma according to the World Health Organization and the Department of Defense. Often, unresolved trauma can lead to self-loathing and, ultimately, suicide. EMDR can help to prevent this. EMDR can also be an effective form of psychotherapy for survivors who are suffering from the traumatic images and thoughts that haunt those that have lost a loved one to suicide.

    Nicole Law, Psy.D.

    The Hidden Risks of LGBT Youth (repeat) – LGBT youth are at an increased risk for suicide and self-harm. This presentation will discuss the impact of factors such as heteronormativity, culture and language have on identity, self-worth and suicide risk. The session will also explore methods of reducing the impact these factors have on suicide risk in school, community and healthcare settings.

    Michelle Cornette, Ph.D.

    Military and Veteran suicide risk (repeat) – Military/veteran suicide has garnered much media attention in recent years. Epidemiological research suggests that suicide rates among veterans has more than double that of age, gender-matched peers with no military service history. The volume of resources expended by VA and DoD in recent years has led to an explosion of research findings on the epidemiology and etiology of military and veteran suicide. The epidemiology of military/ veteran suicide, as well as common and specific risk factors for suicide, will be reviewed in this presentation.

    Judith Burdick, M.A., L.L.P.

    Suicide: From Stigma to Transformation – Stigmatized death, as it relates to suicide, evokes tremendous fear and anxiety in both the greater culture and survivors alike. Survivors are often conflicted about disclosing the true nature and cause of death; and consequently, this holding back limits opportunities to receive much needed social support for proper healing to take place. This, in turn, leads to complex emotions often contributing to high levels of guilt and shame, resulting in depression. In her presentation, Judith Burdick will address the stigma of suicide, its complexities and practical methods to move toward transformation.

    Noon – 1:00 pm

    Plenary Session

    Lunch

    Noon – 1:00 pm

    Karen M. Marshall

    Suicide awareness, prevention, intervention and postvention are rising on the nation’s radar, largely over the past 20 years. Karen Marshall describes positive changes through the steps of her journey as a suicide loss survivor, and how the voices of people personally impacted by suicide deaths and attempts have strengthened advocacy for life-saving change.

    1:15 – 2:00 pm

    Conference Closing

    Healing Ceremony - Drumming for Life

    Judith Sheldon & Issa Abramaleem, First Circle, Inc.

    The loss of death brings us ever closer to life, and to love. Without words, and regardless of skill, our circle drumming will express the journey from loss, to the remembrance of life and to the eternality of love.